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65655-01 - Seminar: Roman Territorial Expansion: Imperialism or Acts of Defence? 3 KP

Semester Herbstsemester 2022
Angebotsmuster einmalig
Dozierende Brandon McDonald (brandon.mcdonald@unibas.ch, BeurteilerIn)
Inhalt The goal of this course is an in-depth analysis of Rome’s drive for empire. Between the fourth and first centuries BCE the Romans expanded their territory throughout the Mediterranean region, and in that time the Roman state went from an Italian city, to encompassing all of Italy, Gaul, Spain, Greece, Macedonia, Egypt, and areas of North Africa and Western Asia. This was achieved with military might, but also with institutions that were meticulously implemented and largely maintained for many centuries, leading to one of the most successful extensions of power and managerial prowess in recorded history. Still, there are questions surrounding the intensions behind Roman territorial expansion. One question that is continually raised is: was the expansion of Roman power a necessary defense mechanism – reactions to powerful and aggressive neighbors – or was Rome just a militaristic state with an embedded cultural ethos that fostered a thirst for power?
This course will analyze that question, along with a multitude of other related questions, by examining the political, economic, social, religious and military structures that allowed for Rome’s massive expansion and the retention of their Empire in late antiquity. In class and in readings, we will review all of the evidence at our disposal, including written evidence (from ancient authors and documenters) and archaeological evidence (architectural, ceramic, numismatic, epigraphic, etc.), as well as secondary literature which has in recent decades seen much debating amongst scholars about Rome’s drive for territory. We will also investigate Rome’s environmental imperialism, a lesser studied aspect of Roman Imperialism, but sometimes crucial to its imperialistic decision-making given the Roman world was principally an agricultural economy. With the knowledge we gain from the historical (and in some places scientific) evidence, we will engage with scholarly discussion, and evaluate who, if anyone, is on the right track, but we will evaluate Roman Imperialism predominantly on our own terms.
Literatur A selection of the works that will be read in the course:

Baronowski, Donald W. (2011), Polybius and Roman Imperialism, A&C Black
Champion, Craige E. (2004), Roman Imperialism: Readings and Sources, Blackwell Publishing.
Erskine, Andrew (2010), Roman Imperialism, Edinburgh University Press.
Harris, William V. (1979), War and Imperialism in Republican Rome, 370-70 B.C., Clarendon Press Oxford
Hopkins, Keith. (2004), “Conquerors and Slaves: The Impact of Conquering an Empire on the Political Economy of Italy”, in Craige E. Champion (ed) Roman Imperialism: Readings and Sources, pp. 108-128.
Hoyos, Dexter (ed) (2013) A Companion to Roman Imperialism, Brill.
Mattingly, D. (2011) Imperialism, Power and Identity: Experiencing the Roman Empire, Princeton University Press.
Morley, N. (2001). The Transformation of Italy, 225–28 B.C. Journal of Roman Studies, 91, 50-62.
Potter, David (2006) A Companion to the Roman Empire, John Wiley & Sons.
Woolf, Greg (2004), “Becoming Roman: The Origins of Provincial Civilization in Gaul”, in Craige E. Champion (ed) Roman Imperialism: Readings and Sources, pp. 231-242.

 

Unterrichtssprache Englisch
Einsatz digitaler Medien kein spezifischer Einsatz

 

Intervall wöchentlich
Datum 20.09.2022 – 20.12.2022
Zeit Dienstag, 16.15-17.45 Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Datum Zeit Raum
Dienstag 20.09.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 27.09.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 04.10.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 11.10.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 18.10.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 25.10.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 01.11.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 08.11.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 15.11.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 22.11.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 29.11.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 06.12.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 13.12.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Dienstag 20.12.2022 16.15-17.45 Uhr Rosshof, Tagungsraum 306
Module Modul: Aufbau Alte Geschichte (Bachelor Studienfach Geschichte)
Modul: Epochen der europäischen Geschichte: Alte Geschichte (Master Studiengang Europäische Geschichte in globaler Perspektive )
Modul: Römische Geschichte BA (Bachelor Studienfach Altertumswissenschaften)
Modul: Römische Geschichte BA (Bachelor Studiengang Altertumswissenschaften)
Modul: Römische Geschichte MA (Master Studienfach Alte Geschichte)
Modul: Theorie und Methoden der Alten Geschichte (Bachelor Studienfach Altertumswissenschaften)
Modul: Theorie und Methoden der Alten Geschichte (Bachelor Studiengang Altertumswissenschaften)
Modul: Vertiefung in Alter Geschichte (Master Studienfach Alte Geschichte)
Modul: Vertiefung in Geschichte und Altertumswissenschaften BA (Bachelor Studienfach Altertumswissenschaften)
Modul: Vertiefung in Geschichte und Altertumswissenschaften BA (Bachelor Studiengang Altertumswissenschaften)
Modul: Vertiefung in Geschichte und Altertumswissenschaften MA (Master Studienfach Alte Geschichte)
Wahlbereich Master Geschichte: Empfehlungen (Master Studienfach Geschichte)
Leistungsüberprüfung Lehrveranst.-begleitend
An-/Abmeldung zur Leistungsüberprüfung Anmelden: Belegen; Abmelden: nicht erforderlich
Wiederholungsprüfung keine Wiederholungsprüfung
Skala Pass / Fail
Wiederholtes Belegen nicht wiederholbar
Zuständige Fakultät Philosophisch-Historische Fakultät, studadmin-philhist@unibas.ch
Anbietende Organisationseinheit Fachbereich Alte Geschichte

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