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67961-01 - Seminar: Peace Negotiations 3 KP

Semester Frühjahrsemester 2023
Angebotsmuster einmalig
Dozierende Julián Arévalo (julian.arevalo@unibas.ch, BeurteilerIn)
Inhalt Efforts to put an end to civil wars by negotiated means are highly unsuccessful with about only a quarter of them achieving an agreement, and half of those agreements having failed to be implemented. These figures pose a major challenge for researchers and practitioners interested in supporting peace making and peace building efforts in different contexts across the world.
The complexity of this situation is now increased due to global trends that question the pillars of what has been understood as peace negotiations.
By combining theoretical elements and international experiences, this course aims to develop in the students a conceptual framework for analyzing peace negotiations, in particular at the light of the trends in the field.
The first part of the course centers on the discussions that pay more attention to the right (ripe) moment for peace negotiations, whereas the second centers on the “how”, “what” and “why” of peace negotiations. The third part of the course addresses new trends and challenges in peace negotiations.
Lernziele • At the end of the semester the student will be familiar with the main theories of conflict resolution
• The student will have experience with some negotiation techniques and the way in which they have been used in different conflict scenarios.
• The student will be in capacity to compare different peace negotiations and analyze what might have been the key for success in some cases and of failure in others.
• The student will be familiar with questions that should be addressed when designing a peace negotiation.
Literatur Amaral, Joana. 2021. “‘Spoiling’ in the Public Sphere: Political Opposition to Peace Negotiations and the Referendum Campaign in Colombia.” International Negotiation 26 (3): 453–78. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069-bja10014.
Amer, Ramses. 2007. “The Resolution of the Cambodian Conflict: Assessing the Explanatory Value of Zartman’s ‘Ripeness Theory.’” Journal of Peace Research 44 (6): 729–42.
Axelrod, Robert M. 2006. The Evolution of Cooperation. Basic Books.
Bakiner, Onur. 2019. “Why Do Peace Negotiations Succeed or Fail? Legal Commitment, Transparency, and Inclusion during Peace Negotiations in Colombia (2012–2016) and Turkey (2012–2015).” Negotiation Journal 35 (4): 471–513. https://doi.org/10.1111/nejo.12301.
Ben-Josef Hirsch, Michal. 2021. “Historical Acknowledgment as an Early Conflict Negotiation Strategy: A Feasibility Study of Israel/Palestine.” Negotiation Journal 37 (2): 163–91. https://doi.org/10.1111/nejo.12345.
Burton, John W. 1990. Conflict: Human Needs Theory. Houndmilles: St. Martin’s Press.
Cobb, Sara. 2016. “Engaging Conflict Narratives.” International Journal of Conflict Engagement and Resolution 4 (2): 127–30.
Cohen-Almagor, Raphael. 2021. “Lessons from Peace Negotiations: Interview with Ehud Olmert.” Israel Affairs 27 (6): 1160–89. https://doi.org/10.1080/13537121.2021.1993000.
Corredor, Elizabeth S. 2022. “Feminist Action at the Negotiation Table: An Exploration Inside the 2010–2016 Colombian Peace Talks.” International Negotiation, 1–24. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069-bja10063.
Druckman, Daniel, and Valerie Rosoux. 2016. “Focal Points and Turning Points in Negotiation: A Comparative Analysis.” Negotiation Journal 32 (2): 127–50. https://doi.org/10.1111/nejo.12151.
Druckman, Daniel, and Lynn Wagner. 2021. “The Role of Issues in Negotiation: Framing, Linking, and Ordering.” Negotiation Journal 37 (2): 249–78. https://doi.org/10.1111/nejo.12358.
Fawcett, Edmund. 2018. Liberalism. The Life of an Idea. Princeton & Oxford: Princeton University Press.
Fisher, Roger, William Ury, and Bruce Patton. 2012. Getting to Yes: Negotiating Agreement Without Giving In. New York: Random House Business Books.
Frazer, Owen, and Lakhdar Ghettas, eds. 2013. “Conflict Transformation in Practice. Approaches to Conflict Transformation. Lessons from Morocco, Tajikistan and Yemen.” Cordoba Now Forum. CSS ETZ Zurich.
Galtung, Johan. 1969. “Violence, Peace, and Peace Research.” Journal of Peace Research 6 (3): 167–91.
Hancock, Landon E. 2001. “To Act or Wait: A Two-Stage View of Ripeness.” International Studies Perspectives 2 (2): 195–205.
Hartwell, Leon. 2019. “Conflict Resolution: Lessons from the Dayton Peace Process.” Negotiation Journal 35 (4): 443–69.
Holbrooke, Richard. 1998. To End a War. New York: Random House.
Horowitz, Donald L. 1985. Ethnic Groups in Conflict. Berkeley, Calif.: University of California Press.
Iji, Tetsuro. 2022. “The Limits and Potentials of UN Mediation: Views from Ripeness Theory.” International Negotiation 27 (3): 354–85. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069-bja10077.
Jaramillo, Sergio. 2014. “Territorial Peace.” In . Harvard University.
———. 2017. “The Possibility of Peace.” In . The University of Chicago: Harris School of Public Policy.
Kissinger, Henry. 2011. On China. New York: The Penguin Press.
Kleiboer, Marieke. 1994. “Ripeness of Conflict: A Fruitful Notion?” Edited by Richard N. Haass, Stephen J. Stedman, and I. William Zartman. Journal of Peace Research 31 (1): 109–16.
Lax, David A., and James K. Sebenius. 2006. 3-D Negotiation : Powerful Tools to Change the Game in Your Most Important Deals. Harvard Business School Press.
Lilja, Jannie. 2011. “Ripening Within? Strategies Used by Rebel Negotiators to End Ethnic War.” Negotiation Journal 27 (3): 311–42. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1571-9979.2011.00310.x.
Mooradian, Moorad, and Daniel Druckman. 1999. “Hurting Stalemate or Mediation? The Conflict over Nagorno-Karabakh, 1990-95.” Journal of Peace Research 36 (6): 709–27.
Nylander, Dag, Rita Sandberg, and Idun Tvedt. 2018. “Designing Peace: The Colombian Peace Process.” Norwegian Centre for Conflict Resolution.
Pruitt, Dean G. 1997. “Ripeness Theory and the Oslo Talks.” International Negotiation 2 (2): 237–50. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069720847960.
———. 2007. “Readiness Theory and the Northern Ireland Conflict.” American Behavioral Scientist 50 (11): 1520–41. https://doi.org/10.1177/0002764207302467.
Ruhe, Constantin. 2015. “Anticipating Mediated Talks: Predicting the Timing of Mediation with Disaggregated Conflict Dynamics.” Journal of Peace Research 52 (2): 243–57.
Schelling, Thomas C. 1956. “An Essay on Bargaining.” The American Economic Review 46 (3): 281–306.
Schiff, Amira. 2014. “On Success and Failure: Readiness Theory and the Aceh and Sri Lanka Peace Processes.” International Negotiation 19 (1): 89–126. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069-12341271.
Schwartz, Adi, and Eytan Gilboa. 2021. “False Readiness: Expanding the Concept of Readiness in Conflict Resolution Theory.” International Studies Review 23 (4): 1328–48. https://doi.org/10.1093/isr/viab006.
———. 2022. “The False Readiness Theory: Explaining Failures to Negotiate Israeli-Palestinian Peace.” International Negotiation, June, 1–29. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069-bja10059.
Sheikh, Mona Kanwal. 2022. “Worldviews and Conflict Analysis.” Negotiation Journal n/a (n/a). https://doi.org/10.1111/nejo.12411.
Suárez, Juan-Luis, and Yadira Lizama-Mué. 2021. “Why Language Matters? Colombia’s Passing Theory of Peace.” Peacebuilding 9 (4): 409–24. https://doi.org/10.1080/21647259.2021.1895614.
swisspeace. 2017. “Mediation Process Matrix.”
Tarabeih, Hussein, Shula Gilad, and Jennifer Sheffield. 2022. “The Sakhnin/Misgav Land Dispute: Using 3-D Negotiation Strategies to Analyze Conflict Resolution in Israel.” Negotiation Journal n/a (n/a). https://doi.org/10.1111/nejo.12417.
Urlacher, Brian R. 2011. “Political Constraints and Civil War Conflict Resolution.” Civil Wars 13 (2): 81–98. https://doi.org/10.1080/13698249.2011.576134.
Walch, Colin. 2016. “Rethinking Ripeness Theory: Explaining Progress and Failure in Civil War Negotiations in the Philippines and Colombia.” International Negotiation 21 (1): 75–103. https://doi.org/10.1163/15718069-12341325.
Walter, Barbara F. 2002. Committing to Peace: The Successful Settlement of Civil Wars. Princeton, N.J: Princeton University Press.
Wright, Lawrence. 2014. Thirteen Days in September. Carter, Begin and Sadat in Camp David. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.
Yusuf, Moeed, and Adil Najam. 2009. “Kashmir: Ripe for Resolution?” Third World Quarterly 30 (8): 1503–28.
Zartman, I. William. 1977. “Negotiation as a Joint Decision-Making Process.” The Journal of Conflict Resolution 21 (4): 619–38.
———. 1989. Ripe for Resolution: Conflict and Intervention in Africa. New York.
Bemerkungen Attention:
All Seminars will be graded in the Department of Political Science.
Grading scale 6.0 to 1.0, whereupon 4.0 is a pass.
The number of participants is limited. The places are assigned according to date of enrollment and subject of study. Priority will be given to students of Political Science.

 

Teilnahmebedingungen Attention:
All Seminars will be graded in the Department of Political Science.
Grading scale 6.0 to 1.0, whereupon 4.0 is a pass.
The number of participants is limited. The places are assigned according to date of enrollment and subject of study. Priority will be given to students of Political Science.
Unterrichtssprache Englisch
Einsatz digitaler Medien kein spezifischer Einsatz

 

Intervall wöchentlich
Datum 22.02.2023 – 31.05.2023
Zeit Mittwoch, 16.15-17.45 Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Datum Zeit Raum
Mittwoch 22.02.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 01.03.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Fasnachstferien
Mittwoch 08.03.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 15.03.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 22.03.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 29.03.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 05.04.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 12.04.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 19.04.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 26.04.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 03.05.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 10.05.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 17.05.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 24.05.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Mittwoch 31.05.2023 16.15-17.45 Uhr Bernoullistrasse 14/16, Seminarraum 02.004
Module Modul: Conflicts and Peacebuilding (Master Studiengang Changing Societies: Migration – Conflicts – Resources )
Modul: Fields: Governance and Politics (Master Studiengang African Studies)
Modul: Regionaler Fokus M.A. (Master Studienfach Politikwissenschaft)
Modul: Transfer: Europa interdisziplinär (Master Studiengang Europäische Geschichte in globaler Perspektive )
Modul: Vertiefung Politikwissenschaft M.A. (Master Studienfach Politikwissenschaft)
Vertiefungsmodul Global Europe: Friedens- und Konfliktforschung (Masterstudium: European Global Studies)
Leistungsüberprüfung Lehrveranst.-begleitend
Hinweise zur Leistungsüberprüfung 2 written products, one on theories of peace negotiations and the other about the analysis of a case
An-/Abmeldung zur Leistungsüberprüfung Anmelden: Belegen; Abmelden: nicht erforderlich
Wiederholungsprüfung keine Wiederholungsprüfung
Skala 1-6 0,5
Wiederholtes Belegen nicht wiederholbar
Zuständige Fakultät Philosophisch-Historische Fakultät, studadmin-philhist@unibas.ch
Anbietende Organisationseinheit Fachbereich Politikwissenschaft

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